Electronic Cigarettes

Are they safer than tobacco?

Or are they a high-tech way to hook a new generation on a bad nicotine habit?

 

Nobody knows yet.

Nevertheless, ready or not, the era of e-cigarettes is here. It’s a booming, billion-dollar industry. The number of teens and tweens using these products doubled between 2011 and 2012.

How E-Cigarettes Work

They look like the real thing. The end glows as you inhale. As you exhale, you puff out a cloud of what looks like smoke. It’s vapor, similar to the fog you might see at rock shows.

All e-cigarettes work basically the same way. Inside, there’s a battery, a heating element, and a cartridge that holds nicotine and other liquids and flavorings. Features and costs vary. Some are disposable. Others have a rechargeable battery and refillable cartridges.

Using an e-cigarette is called “vaping.”

Are They Safe?

The nicotine inside the cartridges is addictive. When you stop using it, you can get withdrawal symptoms including feeling irritable, depressed, restless and anxious. It can be dangerous for people with heart problems. It may also harm your arteries over time.

So far, evidence suggests that e-cigarettes may be safer than regular cigarettes. The biggest danger from tobacco is the smoke, and e-cigarettes don’t burn. Tests show the levels of dangerous chemicals they give off are a fraction of what you’d get from a real cigarette. But what’s in them can vary.

“E-cigarettes may be less harmful than cigarettes,”… “But we still don’t know enough about their long-term risks or the effects of secondhand exposure.”

Pro and Con

E-cigarettes have triggered a fierce debate among health experts who share the same goal – reducing the disease and death caused by tobacco. But they disagree about whether e-cigarettes make the problem better or worse.

Opponents say that because nicotine is addictive, e-cigarettes could be a “gateway drug,” leading nonsmokers and kids to use tobacco. They also worry that manufacturers — with huge advertising budgets and celebrity endorsements — could make smoking popular again. That would roll back decades of progress in getting people to quit or never start smoking.

Others look at possible benefits for smokers. “Obviously, it would be best if smokers could quit completely,”… “But if that’s not possible, I think they’d be a lot better off with e-cigarettes. They’re a safer alternative.”

Some medical experts compare replacing tobacco with e-cigarettes to heroin users switching to the painkiller methadone. The replacement may have its own risks, but it’s safer.

Some supporters believe that e-cigarettes could help people quit, just like nicotine gum. Research hasn’t shown that yet, though.

What Parents Should Know

Nicotine can affect brain development in children and teens.

Some e-cigarettes have candy flavoring, which could make them appealing to kids.

They don’t leave a smell like tobacco. So it’s harder for parents to know if their kids are vaping.

What Adults and Smokers Need to Know

If you don’t smoke, don’t start vaping. There are no health benefits and some risks.

If you smoke and are trying to quit, you’re better off with an FDA-approved method of quitting. There’s good evidence that they help. E-cigarettes may turn out to be an effective way to quit, but we don’t have the proof yet.

If you’re not planning to quit, would it be healthier to switch from tobacco products to e-cigarettes? Maybe… Please Talk to your local doctor about the risks and benefits.


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OCC’s epidemiologist is closely monitoring the COVID-19 status and is actively issuing updates as they are available. The Centers for Disease Control and the World Health Organization are the most trusted sources online.  While the CDC has announced new mask protocols for vaccinated individuals, there will be no changes for our office protocols for patients, guests, and staff members as the announcement does not apply to hospitals or medical facilities. Masks are still a requirement for all patients, guests and staff at our facility.

As we reinitiate weight loss surgery, we are constantly adapting and installing new and updated safety measures.

Weight loss surgery is medically necessary.

Bariatric Surgery and the clash of two pandemics.   

Major metabolic and bariatric surgery Societies and colleges globally are now calling for the safe resumption of bariatric and metabolic surgery before the COVID-19 pandemic is declared over. 

The sooner bariatric surgery can be safely performed, the quicker obesity, type 2 diabetes, and other diseases can be reduced or resolved as they are not only chronic they are also progressive.  Obesity is also linked to more than 40 diseases including type 2 diabetes, hypertension, heart disease, stroke, sleep apnea, osteoarthritis, and at least 13 different types of cancer.

A recent statement from the ASMBS says “Before COVID-19 began, it was clear that patients with obesity were ‘safer through surgery.’ In the era of COVID-19, ‘safer through surgery’ for patients with obesity may prove to be even more important than before.” Obesity and Metabolic syndrome have been identified as an independent risk factor for adverse outcomes including death among COVID-19 patients.

See here for full COVID-19 update. 

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